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Flower of the Week: Green Hydrangeas

22 Jul

Mini hydrangeas

Lately Echelon has especially taken to the extremely intriguing green hydrangeas that have been cut slightly early by the growers. These hydrangeas have a greater variety of form and lines between the small buds and the larger petals that have bloomed. The buds have lovely, rounded petals tightly grouped together, and the full bloomed petals are flat and papery thin about 1″ across in bunches about 4-8″ wide. The stems are around 10-24″ long.

They add a very interesting touch to arrangements with other flowers and are fascinating enough to look very pleasing on their own! Another benefit of the early cut hydrangeas is that they will last longer when kept in water than the fully bloomed, as you get to watch all of the buds bloom over a span of up to 10 days. Hydrangeas are also available year round.

The hydrangea’s flower language meanings are perseverance and ‘Thank you for understanding.’

So, if you are only familiar with the fully bloomed hydrangeas you see growing on the bushes, give the early cuts a try for a unique edge in the floral arrangement of your choice!

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Flower of the Week- Calla Lily

14 Jun

 

This summer wedding season, calla lilies (Zantedeschia aethiopica) , in all their vibrant color and size variations, are quickly becoming a favorite choice for outfit decorations, bouquets, room arrangements, etc. They are well suited for any ornamental need!

Also called Trumpet lilies, Arum lilies, and Pig lilies, Calla lilies have an elegant, swooping curvature to the petal shape and have large and mini sizes. They come in white, lavender, purple, pink, red, peach, orange, yellow, green, and the very intriguing bicolored forms.

Calla lilies are perennial and require part shade, and full sun in cooler climates. They are definitely not edible, but who would want to stop looking at them any how?

They are fragrant and  last between four and eight days, but look lovely dried if you want to hold on them to remember your special occasion!

Flower Of The Week

8 Apr

The flower this week is a very unique one that goes by many names.
Eremurus
spencers pics2
The common names for Eremurus are Desert Candle, Foxtail Lily, Bottle Brush, and Needle of Cleopatra. It’s a spring bloomer flowering from March to August. It comes in Peach, Orange, and Yellow. It is a long cylindrical, tapering flower with many star shaped florets clustered along a 24 to 48 inch stem. Be careful not to get the blooms wet because they are very fragile.
Meaning: Endurance; I hold you in high esteem

Flower Of The Week

1 Apr

The flower this week is actually a flowering shrub that blooms in the spring.
Azalea
florist_azalea
We’ll be seeing the azaleas bloom here in Knoxville very soon! We have some gorgeous potted azaleas here at the shop as well. They are in the Rhododendron family and like to be in the shade. The blooms can be one of the 4 colors pictured above. There are Azalea festivals in Alabama, Florida, Georgia, North Carolina, South Carolina, & Virginia.
Meaning: Take care of yourself for me.

Flower Of The Week

19 Mar

The flower of the week is an adorable little spring flower.
Muscari
muscari
Muscari is also known as Grape Hyacinth and blooms in the spring. It can be white or blue and only grows to be 8 inches tall. The the tiny blooms cluster together in a way that resembles an upside down bunch of grapes (hence the name). It looks lovely paired with other spring flowers like tulips, daffodils, ranunculus, etc.

muscari_ranunculus
muscari_bouquet

Flower Of The Week

11 Mar

This flower of the week can probably be found in your own backyard. (If not yours, then your neighbor’s.)
Forsythia
forsythia-branch
Forsythia blooms from January through April. The flowers are always yellow and grow along a 30 to 48 inch stem. The Forsythia plant grows as a bush and can be seen all around Knoxville. This flower looks lovely in spring arrangements. Meaning: Anticipation

Flower Of The Week

25 Feb

This week’s flower has gotten a bad rap, but when used correctly it is quite beautiful.
Gypsophilia
gypsophila
Gypsophilia can also be known as just gyp, but is most commonly referred to as baby’s breath. It is usually seen in white, but it can also be pink. Everyone has seen it as a filler for rose arrangements and corsages, but the current trend is to use it for weddings. It is usually seen alone in bouquets, centerpieces, aisle markers etc.

bb2 bb3 bb4 bb5 bb1

Baby’s breath comes in several different varieties, some have tons of tiny blooms (Million Star) and some have bigger blooms, but less of them (New Love). It is very versatile and can be dressed up for an elegant affair, or dressed down for a rustic one.

Meaning: Festivity, Innocence, Pure of Heart, Happiness (kind of perfect for a wedding)